How to Choose Safe Wheel Spacers by Material Performance

Wheel spacers are a cost-effective way to install custom wheels or larger brake kits on vehicles. They can also be used to change wheel bolt patterns and center bore diameters. Typically, they made of steel or aluminum, which are sandwiched between the wheel hub assembly and the wheel, pushing the wheel out to allow for a more aggressive stance and increasing your track width. We’ve seen them work successfully on race cars countless times, as long as you use high-quality spacers and install them properly, wheel spacers are just as safe as normal wheel changing. Before you start a wheel spacer mod, knowledge of the Tensile Strength, Yield Strength, and Failure Elongation is very important when choosing safe wheel spacers. Since these features usually represent the upper limit of the stress that can be applied, in other words, how safe are wheel spacers.

How to Choose Safe Wheel Spacers by Material Performance-Curve

Why Tensile Strength Is Important for Wheel Spacers?

Tensile strength is the maximum tensile load a material can withstand prior to fracture. It is the amount of load or stress that can be handled by a material before it stretches and breaks. The tensile strength of the wheel spacers is the maximum amount of tensile stress that it can be subjected to before failure. So, if a wheel spacer has high tensile strength, it essentially means that it can resist a lot of tension before it breaks. Compared to some cheap casting wheel spacers, BONOSS forged wheel spacers are safer and stronger: Tensile Strength≥310Mpa (AL6061-T6), Tensile Strength≥572Mpa (AL7075-T6), and the Tensile Strength of the cheap alternatives is approximately 125Mpa below. When facing bump and impact loads, higher tensile strength can bear greater forces without breaking.

Why Yield Strength Is Important for Wheel Spacers?

Yield strength is the strength where the deformation turns from elastic deformation to plastic deformation. It is always lower than the ultimate tensile strength. Once the yield point is passed, some fraction of the deformation will be permanent and non-reversible. Yield strength is very important for wheel spacers since it is the maximum stress that can be applied before it begins to change shape permanently. So, if a wheel spacer has high yield strength, it essentially means that it can resist a lot of tension before it breaks. Compared to some cheap casting wheel spacers, BONOSS forged wheel spacers are safer and stronger: Yield Strength≥275Mpa (AL6061-T6), Yield Strength≥503Mpa (AL7075-T6), and the Yield Strength of the cheap alternatives is approximately 55Mpa below. When facing bump and impact loads, higher yield strength is able to withstand such loading for a longer period of time so as to avoid wheel spacers failure. Higher yield strength also equals safer and higher performance.

BONOSS Forged Lightweight Plus Wheel Spacers Custom Wheel Offset Safely Installed Your Finest Wheels

Why Failure Elongation Is Important for Wheel Spacers?

Failure Elongation is the amount of strain that can be withstood before failure in tensile testing. It is used to express the performance of a material. Elongation is inversely proportional to hardness, tensile strength, and yield strength. The greater hardness, tensile strength, and yield strength of a material, the less it will elongate under stress. It will take more force to stretch a hard material with high hardness, high tensile strength, and high yield strength than to stretch a soft material with low hardness, low tensile strength, and low yield strength. In simple words, high elongation means lower hardness, tensile strength, and yield strength. Compared to some cheap casting wheel spacers, BONOSS forged wheel spacers are safer and stronger: Failure Elongation≈8% (AL6061-T6), Failure Elongation≈5% (AL7075-T6), and the Failure Elongation of the cheap alternatives is approximately 30% above. Elongation is important in wheel spacers that withstand bumps and impacts during driving. It is also important in manufacturing – it measures how much bending and shaping a material can withstand without breaking.